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  • 12 Mar 2017
    Come cast your vote today for Howzat on CBC Music Searchlight !!!"Luv Dust"London, Ontario, Canadahttp://www.cbcmusic.ca/searchlight/entries/1/0/17/30/howzat
    17 Posted by Ariella Records Canada
  • Come cast your vote today for Howzat on CBC Music Searchlight !!!"Luv Dust"London, Ontario, Canadahttp://www.cbcmusic.ca/searchlight/entries/1/0/17/30/howzat
    Mar 12, 2017 17
  • 03 Feb 2017
    Want to be part of a fun Indie Crowdfunder?Cool prizes and awesome swag... go here:  https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/james-keri-web-series-an-indie-music-journey-band#/Share with friends and RT!
    39 Posted by Bristol Kids
  • Want to be part of a fun Indie Crowdfunder?Cool prizes and awesome swag... go here:  https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/james-keri-web-series-an-indie-music-journey-band#/Share with friends and RT!
    Feb 03, 2017 39
  • 28 Dec 2016
      One of the most important relationships in music is between the artist and his or her manager. The manager’s specific role will depend on the manager and artist, but generally the manager advises and directs the artist in connection with all matters relating to the artist’s professional career in the entertainment industry. That’s pretty broad. As such, It’s important that the artist and manager are on the same page about the manager’s role, and also about their collective goals, and expectations of each other. There may be a verbal or written agreement between the artist and manager. The two may have decided verbally that the manager will help the artist and in return get 10%. The challenges with this arrangement include that “helping the artist” isn’t clear, and likely means something different to each. The 10% is 10% of what – money from opportunities the manager obtains directly, or 10% of music sales and tours? What about royalties? Point being, having a verbal agreement to help an artist in return for 10% can lead to arguments, an expedited end to the relationship, and/or fear that the other person will take legal action at some point if there’s a lot of money involved. A written agreement between the artist and manager should outline the details of the relationship to ensure that the artist and manager are on the same page, which helps to avoid conflict in future. A management agreement doesn’t guarantee there won’t be conflict, but it does make the parties talk about the tough questions early on. It’s easier to have a conversation about how to divide up money before there’s money to divide. There are some clauses (sections) of the management agreement that can either be drafted (written) to be advantageous for the artist, or advantageous for the artist. Ideally, both the artist and manager fully understand how each element of the agreement could be structured, in order that the agreement is reasonable. One of the purposes of this blog is to go though some of the clauses that would generally appear in a music management agreement. Regarding exclusivity, the manager is more likely than not, the artist’s only manager, but the artist may not be the manager’s only artist. If the artist isn’t the manager’s only client, it may be helpful for the artist to get a minimum commitment of time that the manager promises to provide. The amount of time that the agreement covers is referred to as the term. The term may be for a specific number of years. Also, it may have extensions which could happen automatically unless one of the parties informs the other by a certain time that the term shouldn’t extend, or perhaps based on certain thresholds. A threshold may be obtaining a certain level of income. For example, a term might be one year, and extend to a second year if the artist has obtained a certain level of income in the first year. Regarding the actual services, it’s important to be on the same page about what the manager is required to do, and what authority the manager has regarding the artist’s career. A key element of this is decision making. Does the artist need to pre-approve anything or everything that the manger does? Can the manager sign on behalf of the artist (power of attorney), either with or with the artist’s approval each time? Regarding compensation, one way for the artist to pay the manager is to the provide the manager a commission equal to a certain percentage of funds earned from certain revenue sources. The percentage may be a set number regardless, or might increase based on the amount of funds the artist earns. As alluded to above, it’s very important to define from the outset what’s commissionable and what’s not commissionable. A related matter is expenses. Who’s responsible for paying for expenses? One scenario is that the manager can pay for expenses and get reimbursed from the artist, either whenever the managers asks to be repaid, or only once the artist generates enough money. If the manager is given the right to make purchases which will eventually be covered by the artist’s revenues, are there any limitations on what decisions the manager makes regarding expenses? Perhaps the manager has the right, but not the obligation, to pay for expenses up to a certain monetary threshold, but otherwise needs the artist’s permission. There may be revenue generators that the parties may agree are not commissionable, for example the artist’s job outside of the music industry (until the artist can ideally focus 100% on the music career) to music video grants. Other related questions include whether artist-generated funds are paid directly to the artist or manager, what the manager is entitled to, if anything, after the management agreement term ends, and the details surrounding the manager’s obligations to report the numbers (revenues and expenses) to the artist and to pay the artist. Other elements of a management agreement include the artist confirming she has the authority to enter into the agreement, the rights of each party if the other party breaches (breaks) the agreement, the extent to which the manager can assign (give) any of the manager’s rights under the agreement to someone else, and the details surrounding how the agreement can terminate (end) earlier than planned. At the end of the day, the most important words on the agreement are the names of the people who are signing. As an artist, you want a manager that you can trust, and who’s a good fit with your work habits, style, and ambitions. The same goes for the manager. There must be a good fit, and a formal written agreement can’t make an artist and manager a better fit with each other. However, having an open conversation about the topics raised in this blog, among others, can help the artist and manager figure out if the other person is the right partner. — Byron Pascoe is a lawyer with Edwards PC, Creative Law. This boutique law firm provides legal services to Music, Film, Animation, TV, Digital Media, Game and Publishing industry clients. For more information and blogs, please visit www.edwardslaw.ca © 2016 Edwards PC * This blog is for general informational purposes only and is not to be construed as legal advice. Please contact Edwards PC, Creative Law or another lawyer, if you wish to apply these concepts to your specific circumstances.
  •   One of the most important relationships in music is between the artist and his or her manager. The manager’s specific role will depend on the manager and artist, but generally the manager advises and directs the artist in connection with all matters relating to the artist’s professional career in the entertainment industry. That’s pretty broad. As such, It’s important that the artist and manager are on the same page about the manager’s role, and also about their collective goals, and expectations of each other. There may be a verbal or written agreement between the artist and manager. The two may have decided verbally that the manager will help the artist and in return get 10%. The challenges with this arrangement include that “helping the artist” isn’t clear, and likely means something different to each. The 10% is 10% of what – money from opportunities the manager obtains directly, or 10% of music sales and tours? What about royalties? Point being, having a verbal agreement to help an artist in return for 10% can lead to arguments, an expedited end to the relationship, and/or fear that the other person will take legal action at some point if there’s a lot of money involved. A written agreement between the artist and manager should outline the details of the relationship to ensure that the artist and manager are on the same page, which helps to avoid conflict in future. A management agreement doesn’t guarantee there won’t be conflict, but it does make the parties talk about the tough questions early on. It’s easier to have a conversation about how to divide up money before there’s money to divide. There are some clauses (sections) of the management agreement that can either be drafted (written) to be advantageous for the artist, or advantageous for the artist. Ideally, both the artist and manager fully understand how each element of the agreement could be structured, in order that the agreement is reasonable. One of the purposes of this blog is to go though some of the clauses that would generally appear in a music management agreement. Regarding exclusivity, the manager is more likely than not, the artist’s only manager, but the artist may not be the manager’s only artist. If the artist isn’t the manager’s only client, it may be helpful for the artist to get a minimum commitment of time that the manager promises to provide. The amount of time that the agreement covers is referred to as the term. The term may be for a specific number of years. Also, it may have extensions which could happen automatically unless one of the parties informs the other by a certain time that the term shouldn’t extend, or perhaps based on certain thresholds. A threshold may be obtaining a certain level of income. For example, a term might be one year, and extend to a second year if the artist has obtained a certain level of income in the first year. Regarding the actual services, it’s important to be on the same page about what the manager is required to do, and what authority the manager has regarding the artist’s career. A key element of this is decision making. Does the artist need to pre-approve anything or everything that the manger does? Can the manager sign on behalf of the artist (power of attorney), either with or with the artist’s approval each time? Regarding compensation, one way for the artist to pay the manager is to the provide the manager a commission equal to a certain percentage of funds earned from certain revenue sources. The percentage may be a set number regardless, or might increase based on the amount of funds the artist earns. As alluded to above, it’s very important to define from the outset what’s commissionable and what’s not commissionable. A related matter is expenses. Who’s responsible for paying for expenses? One scenario is that the manager can pay for expenses and get reimbursed from the artist, either whenever the managers asks to be repaid, or only once the artist generates enough money. If the manager is given the right to make purchases which will eventually be covered by the artist’s revenues, are there any limitations on what decisions the manager makes regarding expenses? Perhaps the manager has the right, but not the obligation, to pay for expenses up to a certain monetary threshold, but otherwise needs the artist’s permission. There may be revenue generators that the parties may agree are not commissionable, for example the artist’s job outside of the music industry (until the artist can ideally focus 100% on the music career) to music video grants. Other related questions include whether artist-generated funds are paid directly to the artist or manager, what the manager is entitled to, if anything, after the management agreement term ends, and the details surrounding the manager’s obligations to report the numbers (revenues and expenses) to the artist and to pay the artist. Other elements of a management agreement include the artist confirming she has the authority to enter into the agreement, the rights of each party if the other party breaches (breaks) the agreement, the extent to which the manager can assign (give) any of the manager’s rights under the agreement to someone else, and the details surrounding how the agreement can terminate (end) earlier than planned. At the end of the day, the most important words on the agreement are the names of the people who are signing. As an artist, you want a manager that you can trust, and who’s a good fit with your work habits, style, and ambitions. The same goes for the manager. There must be a good fit, and a formal written agreement can’t make an artist and manager a better fit with each other. However, having an open conversation about the topics raised in this blog, among others, can help the artist and manager figure out if the other person is the right partner. — Byron Pascoe is a lawyer with Edwards PC, Creative Law. This boutique law firm provides legal services to Music, Film, Animation, TV, Digital Media, Game and Publishing industry clients. For more information and blogs, please visit www.edwardslaw.ca © 2016 Edwards PC * This blog is for general informational purposes only and is not to be construed as legal advice. Please contact Edwards PC, Creative Law or another lawyer, if you wish to apply these concepts to your specific circumstances.
    Dec 28, 2016 54
  • 30 Aug 2016
     Everyone Benefits  From Music. Everyone who is alive and above ground when they wake up has a chance to make a difference. Don't come from a place of how can I get rich, instead come from a place of how can i make the world a better place ? ~ What can i do to benefit all of mankind? Music is Life. At McGill University in Montreal they proved music helps us raise our grades up higher in other subjects in School. Music makes it so we use all of our brain. It is vital to our happiness. Never forget that! It is better to be the best version of yourself and make your music so others are happy than to just chase money. Music has so many side benefits it is placed in the exceptional category by Bristol Kids Band. Instead of removing music classes from schools we should be adding it back in every year. James Walsh
    256 Posted by Bristol Kids
  •  Everyone Benefits  From Music. Everyone who is alive and above ground when they wake up has a chance to make a difference. Don't come from a place of how can I get rich, instead come from a place of how can i make the world a better place ? ~ What can i do to benefit all of mankind? Music is Life. At McGill University in Montreal they proved music helps us raise our grades up higher in other subjects in School. Music makes it so we use all of our brain. It is vital to our happiness. Never forget that! It is better to be the best version of yourself and make your music so others are happy than to just chase money. Music has so many side benefits it is placed in the exceptional category by Bristol Kids Band. Instead of removing music classes from schools we should be adding it back in every year. James Walsh
    Aug 30, 2016 256
  • 04 Jun 2016
    All matter and sound have vibration. A desk, a living plant and a word have vibrations. When we speak, the spoken word can have a tremendous effect. The power of a word is positive or negative. It is one thing for a word to be in the mind as a thought, but once it is released, it has power. For example it can be a blessing or a curse. Words of blessings build someone up. Words of curses can ultimately destroy a human being without ever laying a hand on him or her.   “In the beginning was the word …” John 1:1. Ultimately, the lyrics in music originate with words which become verses. Writing the lyrics of songs involves being somewhat of a poet expressing thoughts and ideas, painting a picture with words, using words to express emotions and to emit emotions or thoughts from listeners. Sometimes we listen to music with the intention to resonate with how we are presently feeling, to change our mood, to uplift our spirits, or to take us away into a different realm.   Lyrics that express negative feelings can attract the listener who is resonating with a similar negative vibration due to life’s hurts, anger, frustrations, struggles or disappointments. Because the listener is resonating with the negative vibration of the song, he or she can “groove” with the music. A person who is not resonating with any of the above emotions may turn the music off and look for a song which resonates with his or her interests or feelings.   The question arises; why do people like certain types of music? There are many genres: Jazz, Country, Rock, Reggae, Pop, R&B, Inspirational etc. Music is vibration. Each genre has a distinctive vibration which sets it apart from other genres and makes it identifiable. Some people do not like listening to country; others love country; others love listening to music that is “busy”, and others only listen to easy listening music. It is a matter of preference. Listeners identify with a certain vibration that a song emits. Words can be positive or negative. Once words are released from thought to being expressed, they have power. The choice of words is important in song writing. Words are an important contribution to the vibration of a song; a vibration in which listeners either resonate with or have a desire to resonate with.    
    648 Posted by Pam Nori
  • All matter and sound have vibration. A desk, a living plant and a word have vibrations. When we speak, the spoken word can have a tremendous effect. The power of a word is positive or negative. It is one thing for a word to be in the mind as a thought, but once it is released, it has power. For example it can be a blessing or a curse. Words of blessings build someone up. Words of curses can ultimately destroy a human being without ever laying a hand on him or her.   “In the beginning was the word …” John 1:1. Ultimately, the lyrics in music originate with words which become verses. Writing the lyrics of songs involves being somewhat of a poet expressing thoughts and ideas, painting a picture with words, using words to express emotions and to emit emotions or thoughts from listeners. Sometimes we listen to music with the intention to resonate with how we are presently feeling, to change our mood, to uplift our spirits, or to take us away into a different realm.   Lyrics that express negative feelings can attract the listener who is resonating with a similar negative vibration due to life’s hurts, anger, frustrations, struggles or disappointments. Because the listener is resonating with the negative vibration of the song, he or she can “groove” with the music. A person who is not resonating with any of the above emotions may turn the music off and look for a song which resonates with his or her interests or feelings.   The question arises; why do people like certain types of music? There are many genres: Jazz, Country, Rock, Reggae, Pop, R&B, Inspirational etc. Music is vibration. Each genre has a distinctive vibration which sets it apart from other genres and makes it identifiable. Some people do not like listening to country; others love country; others love listening to music that is “busy”, and others only listen to easy listening music. It is a matter of preference. Listeners identify with a certain vibration that a song emits. Words can be positive or negative. Once words are released from thought to being expressed, they have power. The choice of words is important in song writing. Words are an important contribution to the vibration of a song; a vibration in which listeners either resonate with or have a desire to resonate with.    
    Jun 04, 2016 648
  • 19 May 2016
    Creativity is a force of life which drives new understandings and new expressions.  The understandings can be scientific, philosophical, academic, mechanical and applied.  The expressions can be artistic, written or musical.                The musical indie artist needs to have creative abilities in several areas that would parallel the departments that record companies have.  They need to have expertise or access to people who have expertise in music, logistics and promotion.  This includes: photography for cover arts for singles or albums, computer skills for powerpoint or action videos, access to a good videographer, social networking skills, marketing and promotional skills, access to good musicians, recording studios and digital music distribution companies.  The list goes on.  Independent is what the musical indie artist is.                 When wearing all of these hats, the indie artist can not lose site of one important ingredient of a song.  That is the “hook”; the catchy, memorable, lyric line or lines, melody or rhythm that stays in people’s minds and is often the key ingredient to a hit song.  The hook is often repeated in the song and so the repetition also helps listeners to remember it.               A great exercise for developing hooks for songs is to listen for them in other songs and to watch how they impact people.  The following is a suggestion. When you go grocery shopping or frequent a store which is playing streamed music or music from a radio station, listen for hooks.  When I go grocery shopping I often hear “Hey There Delilah” by Plain White T’s.  “Oh what you do to me” stands out.  It can stop me in my tracks as I reach for a product on a shelf and fill me with an emotion.  That’s what successful hooks do.                   I recently walked into Dollarama and I heard a woman in the next aisle singing along with “I’m without your kisses.  I’ll be needing stitches” from Shawn Mendes “Stitches” song.   You know a hook is a successful hook when people not only sing the line but dance to it as well especially in a store.  The lyrics, the melody and the rhythm motivate people to express the hook for themselves.                “Born in the U.S.A. I was born in the U.S.A.  I was born in the U.S.A.  Born in the U.S.A. now.”  Bruce Springstein’s lyrics are repeated in his song and then he leaves the lyrics out near the end of the song where the melody and rhythm stand alone.  And yes, listeners fill the lines in themselves by singing the hook.  I would consider Bruce’s hook to be an anthem hook—a hook which is rousing and uplifting and identifies with a particular group.               There have been so many powerful hooks throughout the years which have propelled the songs to become hit songs.  Here are some examples:   Beatles:  “Here comes the sun Here comes the sun and I say, It’s all right” in “Here Comes the Sun”                                             “   Simon and Garfunkel  “I am a rock. I am an island” from “I Am A Rock”   Bee Gees “And we’re stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive ah, ha, ha ha stayin’ alive….”from “Stayin Alive”   David Bowie and Queen  “Under pressure” from “Under Pressure.”   Tina Turner  “What’s love got to do with it” from “What’s Love Got To Do With It”   Micheal Jackson “ Beat it, Just beat it, beat it, beat it, beat it” from “Beat It”   U2 “But I still haven’t found what I’m looking for” from “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.”                In conclusion, creativity is the means which drives musicians.  If music is one of your passions, then you will not be able to put it down.  It is part of you; it runs through your blood and needs to be expressed.  Undoubtedly, hooks are an important ingredient of songs.  Since grocery stores, automotive stores, department stores and the like have streamed music or music from radio stations playing, we can listen to this music while we are out doing chores.  We can watch and listen for our own reactions to hooks and watch and listen to the reactions of others in the store.  This also keeps us focussed on an important part of our role as a musical indie artist and that is to create songs which are expressions of our own thoughts and emotions and which can resonate with and elicit emotions from our listeners.                 
    651 Posted by Pam Nori
  • Creativity is a force of life which drives new understandings and new expressions.  The understandings can be scientific, philosophical, academic, mechanical and applied.  The expressions can be artistic, written or musical.                The musical indie artist needs to have creative abilities in several areas that would parallel the departments that record companies have.  They need to have expertise or access to people who have expertise in music, logistics and promotion.  This includes: photography for cover arts for singles or albums, computer skills for powerpoint or action videos, access to a good videographer, social networking skills, marketing and promotional skills, access to good musicians, recording studios and digital music distribution companies.  The list goes on.  Independent is what the musical indie artist is.                 When wearing all of these hats, the indie artist can not lose site of one important ingredient of a song.  That is the “hook”; the catchy, memorable, lyric line or lines, melody or rhythm that stays in people’s minds and is often the key ingredient to a hit song.  The hook is often repeated in the song and so the repetition also helps listeners to remember it.               A great exercise for developing hooks for songs is to listen for them in other songs and to watch how they impact people.  The following is a suggestion. When you go grocery shopping or frequent a store which is playing streamed music or music from a radio station, listen for hooks.  When I go grocery shopping I often hear “Hey There Delilah” by Plain White T’s.  “Oh what you do to me” stands out.  It can stop me in my tracks as I reach for a product on a shelf and fill me with an emotion.  That’s what successful hooks do.                   I recently walked into Dollarama and I heard a woman in the next aisle singing along with “I’m without your kisses.  I’ll be needing stitches” from Shawn Mendes “Stitches” song.   You know a hook is a successful hook when people not only sing the line but dance to it as well especially in a store.  The lyrics, the melody and the rhythm motivate people to express the hook for themselves.                “Born in the U.S.A. I was born in the U.S.A.  I was born in the U.S.A.  Born in the U.S.A. now.”  Bruce Springstein’s lyrics are repeated in his song and then he leaves the lyrics out near the end of the song where the melody and rhythm stand alone.  And yes, listeners fill the lines in themselves by singing the hook.  I would consider Bruce’s hook to be an anthem hook—a hook which is rousing and uplifting and identifies with a particular group.               There have been so many powerful hooks throughout the years which have propelled the songs to become hit songs.  Here are some examples:   Beatles:  “Here comes the sun Here comes the sun and I say, It’s all right” in “Here Comes the Sun”                                             “   Simon and Garfunkel  “I am a rock. I am an island” from “I Am A Rock”   Bee Gees “And we’re stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive ah, ha, ha ha stayin’ alive….”from “Stayin Alive”   David Bowie and Queen  “Under pressure” from “Under Pressure.”   Tina Turner  “What’s love got to do with it” from “What’s Love Got To Do With It”   Micheal Jackson “ Beat it, Just beat it, beat it, beat it, beat it” from “Beat It”   U2 “But I still haven’t found what I’m looking for” from “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.”                In conclusion, creativity is the means which drives musicians.  If music is one of your passions, then you will not be able to put it down.  It is part of you; it runs through your blood and needs to be expressed.  Undoubtedly, hooks are an important ingredient of songs.  Since grocery stores, automotive stores, department stores and the like have streamed music or music from radio stations playing, we can listen to this music while we are out doing chores.  We can watch and listen for our own reactions to hooks and watch and listen to the reactions of others in the store.  This also keeps us focussed on an important part of our role as a musical indie artist and that is to create songs which are expressions of our own thoughts and emotions and which can resonate with and elicit emotions from our listeners.                 
    May 19, 2016 651